Posts Tagged ‘Carrots’

Grilled Salmon

Smiths had fresh cedar-wrapped salmon and veggies on Manager’s Special yesterday, so I bought a package!  I wouldn’t normally pay the $11-$12 for this convenience, but their looming expiration date brought the price down to about $7.  I can get excited about that!  The veggies in the wrap appeared to be carrot and green bean, to which we added asparagus and thick turnip slices for a full Paleo dinner.

How long to grill Smiths Krogers cedar wrapped salmon

My griller man was a little worried because the wrap would prevent him from using the meat thermometer, so we Googled how long to grill cedar wrapped salmon.  The results came back as anywhere between 4 to 7 minutes per side, for a grand total of 8 to 14 minutes, on indirect heat.  We have a small cheapo gas grill with lava rocks, so we just turned the flame down as low as it would go and did six minutes on one side and seven minutes on the other.  The salmon ended up slightly overdone, but still moist and delicious thanks to the wrap, and besides – I prefer to cook my about-t0-expire fish as thoroughly as possible.

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Paleo Chicken Leg Dinner Plate

I’m still working on the best way to organize this blog… it’s a tougher thing to figure out than you’d think.  I might create a page of links to photos of my full dinner plates because one of the challenges I’ve run into with eating paleo is deciding on side dishes.  One meat and one vegetable on a plate is a totally decent simple paleo dinner, and that’s what we end up with pretty often here when I’m low on time, but what I’m really talking about is finding ways to provide a wider variety of textures, flavors, and colors to accompany that piece of delicious meat.  Like this Grilled Paleo Cumin Salsa Chicken Leg Dinner Plate.  🙂  Not bad, right?

Paleo Chicken Leg Dinner Plate

The grilled chicken is seasoned with generous amounts of cumin, chili powder, and oregano – no salt.  I’m trying to take it easy on the salt here lately.  The broccoli is frozen and microwave steamed with a little fresh grated Parmesan cheese (not exactly Paleo, but not the end of the world either).  The salad dressing is one part homemade ranch dressing mixed with two parts hot fire roasted salsa.  Add 1/4 avocado and a couple carrots from the farmers’ market, and it’s a full plate!

Paleo Chicken Leg Dinner PlateSpeaking of the farmers’ market, last Saturday was our little town’s seasonal grand opening of the summer farmers’ market!  I’m going to bed soon so I can get up nice and early… I don’t want the vendors to run out of the good stuff before I show up!  Last week, I brought home lots of lettuce, beet leaves (beets are gross but the leaves are good in a mixed salad), strawberries, tomatoes, pistachios, a dozen eggs, and a fistful of chives.  I’m excited to see what will be there tomorrow!

Loaded Turnip Not Potato Soup

Compare a turnip root and a potato that are the same size.  The turnip will have less than half of the calories, less than half the carbs, and a whole bunch more calcium than the potato.  But cooked in soups or fried/grilled, their flavors and especially textures are practically identical!  That’s why I decided to make a Paleo Loaded Baked Potato Soup today – but with some modifications and substitutions that really crank up the healthiness.

Paleo Loaded Potato Soup (made with Turnips instead!)

  1. One big or several small turnips
  2. An onion
  3. Chicken stock
  4. Herbs/Seasonings (I used “Poultry Magic” seasoning mix, thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper)
  5. Other veggies from your fridge (I used garlic, carrots, celery, kale)
  6. Toppings (Cooked bacon, green onions, Greek yogurt in place of sour cream, other finely chopped onions, and if you really want to – some yellow cheese)

Chop everything up into bite size pieces, then toss numbers 1 through 5 into a big soup pot to simmer for at least 20 minutes.  You want the turnips to be nice and soft!  To make the soup creamier, blend some of it in a blender then pour it back in with the rest of the soup.  Pour it in a bowl, top it with your toppings, and chow down!

Paleo Breakfast Lunch Dinner

I was thinking about occasionally posting something along these lines, a photo of my breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  Just a day in the life of my tastebuds sort of thing.  I take more photos than I post anyways.

Breakfast: One egg over easy, spinach and mushrooms, two carrot slices, leftover slider patty from last night, and a sprinkling of blue cheese

Lunch: Salad (green leaf + baby spinach + swiss chard), red onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, a hard boiled egg, 2 pieces uncured bacon, two carrot slices, and homemade tomato basil vinaigrette (lemon juice, red wine vinegar, two tablespoons of sun-dried tomatoes packed in extra virgin olive oil,  dried basil, dried oregano, salt, pepper, and a little extra EVOO)

Paleo PrimaveraDinner: Salad repeat (minus the eggs, mushrooms, & bacon) and my own creation loosely based on a recipe on the back of my tuna packet: Hot Paleo Primavera.  Instead of pasta, I used more broccoli.  Instead of creamy Italian or Ranch, I made my own creamy Italian from Paleo Mayo (which was a buttload of work and a story for another day).  I skipped the salad greens because we had a side salad instead.  And I served the whole mess cooked and warm instead of chilled.  Very satisfying!

Chicken Bacon Vegetable Stew

As scary as it was to leave a pot on the stove simmering overnight, I made my first chicken bone broth out of the carcass of a whole chicken I parboiled the other day.  The idea is just to cover the carcass with water, start it boiling, cover the pot, and then turn it down to simmer for at least overnight – mine simmered for about 24 hours.  Chicken bones are small and weak enough, that 24 hours of that extracts all the nutrients from the bones and lets them escape out into the broth.

I don’t have any fancy strainers or cheesecloth or whatever you’re supposed to use, but I did have a clean plain tshirt.  When I was done with boiling the bones and broth, I just laid the tshirt over a separate big pot and poured the first pot of bone-filled broth onto the shirt/into the second pot.  All the bones and chicken bits were caught in the shirt that I emptied into the garbage and immediately washed.  Poof – strained bone broth!  To which I added a ton of fresh vegetables, cooked chicken, a couple pieces of cooked bacon, and whole bunch of dried herbs like parsley and dill and sage and thyme and so on.  Yum!

Japanese Paleo Nebeyaki Udon Soup

This Japanese soup isn’t exactly Paleo, but it’s not not Paleo either.  What I’m trying to say is that it doesn’t have any of the “bad” foods in it, but it is very vegetarian and includes tofu.  See all those wonderful noodles?  They are made out of tofu (just tofu, nothing else), and they’re actually pretty darn good in a soup like this.  I found the noodles in my Albertson’s grocery store with the rest of the tofu in the produce area.  I don’t know how good they would taste with tomato sauce and meatballs, but they work extremely well in this Japanese soup.

Below are the vegetables I included in the soup along with the noodles.  Just use whatever veggies you have in the house – the real star of this soup is the broth.  And the broth is simply water with hon-dashi soup stock added. Follow the instructions on the hon-dashi box for how much to use per cup of water, taste the broth yourself, and then if you’re like me, add a little extra.  🙂  And if you have any seafood around the house (I didn’t), throw that in too for additional protein and healthy fats and oils!

Japanese Paleo Vegetables