Posts Tagged ‘Garlic’

Loaded Turnip Not Potato Soup

Compare a turnip root and a potato that are the same size.  The turnip will have less than half of the calories, less than half the carbs, and a whole bunch more calcium than the potato.  But cooked in soups or fried/grilled, their flavors and especially textures are practically identical!  That’s why I decided to make a Paleo Loaded Baked Potato Soup today – but with some modifications and substitutions that really crank up the healthiness.

Paleo Loaded Potato Soup (made with Turnips instead!)

  1. One big or several small turnips
  2. An onion
  3. Chicken stock
  4. Herbs/Seasonings (I used “Poultry Magic” seasoning mix, thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper)
  5. Other veggies from your fridge (I used garlic, carrots, celery, kale)
  6. Toppings (Cooked bacon, green onions, Greek yogurt in place of sour cream, other finely chopped onions, and if you really want to – some yellow cheese)

Chop everything up into bite size pieces, then toss numbers 1 through 5 into a big soup pot to simmer for at least 20 minutes.  You want the turnips to be nice and soft!  To make the soup creamier, blend some of it in a blender then pour it back in with the rest of the soup.  Pour it in a bowl, top it with your toppings, and chow down!

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Frittata in a 9 inch Cast Iron Skillet

Frittatas are such an awesome Paleo food.  You can actually make a nearly zero-carb frittata if you really want to, but that would be just silly.  Frittatas are a perfect way to cram some extra veggies – including leafy green ones – into your breakfast, alongside protein rich eggs and other meats.  They’re a great way to clean out some leftover veggies hanging out in your fridge, and you always have leftovers that make very satisfying lunches or snacks too.  They’re quiches without the crust – and the crust was always my least favorite part of quiches anyways!

These are the fillings I used this time, but every frittata I make is different.  I ate a slice for breakfast today topped with a little Greek yogurt.

Recipe for a Basic Paleo Frittata in a 9 inch Cast Iron Skillet

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Make sure all your meats are already cooked.  If you’re using bacon, it should be crunchy, not chewy.
  3. Grab other veggies and seasonings and flavors, and chop everything up into pieces no bigger than about the size of your thumbnail.
  4. Put everything into the skillet on Medium-Low to Medium.  Stir it around for about 60 seconds.
  5. Add enough eggs and/or egg whites to fill up to about where the top of the frittata is in the top photo on this post.  Stir to break up yolks and mix everything evenly.
  6. Cover and let it cook on Medium Low for about 8 minutes.  6 or 10 is probably OK too.  You really just want to bottom to set well.
  7. Uncover the frittata and put it in your oven on the top rack until you can poke a butter knife into the center and it doesn’t come out slimy with raw egg.  This will probably take about 15 to 20 minutes.
  8. Wait for at least five minutes before you slice it up and serve it!

 

 

jambalaya

Jambalaya isn’t a problem for Paleo at all.  Either make some cauliflower rice or do like me and skip it altogether.  It’s not like that’s where the flavor comes from.  Just make your jambalaya nice and thick!

I treated mine like I was making a thick curry or chili.  Here’s the ingredients you’ll want to get together and put into a big pot for 10 minutes of simmering:

Paleo Jambalaya

Makes 2 very generous portions

  1. cooked MEAT, shredded or chopped (I used one andouille sausage which is a traditional ingredient of jambalaya, one bratwurst, and one chicken leg)
  2. 1 chopped up onion, sauteed until translucent
  3. 3 diced garlic cloves
  4. 1 chopped up bell pepper, sauteed until tender (or a mix of bell pepper slices, like I have frozen)
  5. 1 can of diced tomatoes
  6. The spices that turn this normal typical boring list of ingredients into Jambalaya: 1/4 tsp Cayenne, 1 1/4 tsp Black Pepper, 1/4 tsp Thyme, 1/2 tsp Rubbed Sage, 1/4 tsp Dried Basil, 1 tsp Dried Parsley, and then a bunch more cayenne pepper that I didn’t measure.  Because I like my jambalaya spicy!

That’s it.  Just combine it all in a pan and heat it up for about 10 minutes together.

Other ingredients you should definitely consider adding if you have them:

  • Mushrooms
  • Other Peppers (poblano, jalapeno, etc)
  • Celery

It’s only a flesh wound!

 

Natural Edible Spoon Poblano Pepper Chili

OMG, how fun is this!?!  I had two poblano peppers to chop up and add to my chili, but I only did that with one of them because as soon as I cut the first one in half, a natural edible spoon appeared!

Meat and Onions

Sadly not grass fed ground beef… but it’s not the end of the world.  I do what I can, but I’m not made of money and my freezer has limited space.

Makin Chili

Simple Paleo Chili Recipe:

  1. 1lb ground beef
  2. 3 cans diced tomatoes
  3. 1 onion
  4. 1 fresh pepper (I used poblano, but you can use a bell pepper.  whatever.)
  5. 3 garlic cloves
  6. fistful of baby spinach
  7. 1 can mushrooms
  8. chili spices (oregano, chili powder, cumin seed)
  9. ground cayenne pepper for extra spiciness!
  10. an extra poblano pepper will make two spoons for your chili!

Bacon ChopsticksIf you want to add bacon to your chili recipe (I did!) be sure to cook it until it’s crispy first.  Nobody wants soggy chewy bacon in their chili.  Also, if you’re handy with chopsticks, they are the ultimate bacon-flipping tool.  If you’re not handy with chopsticks though, stick to the fork or whatever you use.  Over a sizzling pan of hot bacon grease is not the place to practice using chopsticks!

baby spinach in chili

I add a fistful of baby spinach to every soup I make.  Canned or frozen spinach tastes horrible, but fresh organic baby spinach tastes either good (like in a salad) or like nothing at all (in flavorful soups like chili).

chili secret ingredient

Should I add a tablespoon of unsweetened cocoa powder to my chili?  Why the hell not.  I’m feeling dangerous today!

Natural Edible Spoon Poblano Pepper Chili

And finally, no good Paleo Chili is complete without a little guacamole on top.  I haven’t made my own guac yet… I usually just buy these Wholly Guacamole 100 calorie packs from WalMart.  The ingredients are good, and they’re such a convenient size!  Dig in!

Paleo Spaghetti Sauce

Recipe for Simple Paleo Spaghetti Sauce

(one serving)

  1. One finely chopped tomato
  2. One tablespoon tomato paste
  3. Once diced slice of an onion, doesn’t really matter what color/type
  4. Two tablespoons coconut milk
  5. One minced garlic clove
  6. One teaspoon dry oregano (or four medium fresh oregano leaves)
  7. One teaspoon dry basil (or four medium fresh basil leaves)

Dump everything into a pan on medium heat and stir.  Though if you’re using fresh herbs, leave them out until the very end of simmering time.  As soon as your ingredients start to show signs of boiling (or as close as something that thick can get – probably about a minute or two at most for one serving), turn it down and let it all simmer with a lid on for about 20 minutes.  Add a little salt and pepper if you want to, though I didn’t feel it needed it.  Then stir again and serve, hopefully on spaghetti squash with big fat delicious meatballs!

Blue Cheese Rosemary Garlic Butter on Steak

I cooked my first Grass Fed Steak – A Flat Iron from La Cense Beef – for dinner tonight.  The flavor is a little bit milder than grain-fed beef, which is OK, but what I really liked was the difference in texture.  It absolutely still has the texture of beef, but it’s more delicate.  And the fat in it isn’t so chewy and fatty.  It’s more like an integrated and flavorful part of the beef cut.  I’m happy.

Paleo Flat Iron Steak

But the point of this post isn’t so much about the beef, because I need a little more practice before I gain the hubris to give you all advice on how to properly cook your steak.  🙂  The point is this delicious Steak Butter!  No, it’s not strict Paleo.  But it’s OK with My Personal Paleo Plan.

Soften one tablespoon of butter (for two servings) in the microwave – about 20 seconds.  Add finely chopped herbs (I used rosemary), a finely chopped small garlic clove, and two teaspoons or more stinky cheese.  I had to split the butter into two cups before adding the cheese.  My cup got blue cheese crumbles, and my blue cheese hater got Parmesan cheese in his cup.  Then just fold your ingredients into the butter, and spoon onto your steak just before serving.

PS: Those mashed potatoes in the background are actually mashed cauliflower.  I’m still working out a good recipe for that though too… so far, every time I make it, I’ve added way too much garlic or some other overwhelming flavor.  I’ll figure it out eventually.

Paleo Chicken Chorizo Chili

What’s in my super delicious Paleo Chicken Chorizo Chili?  Well, let’s see… Chicken, Chorizo, Chili Powder, Ground Cumin and as many other vegetables as possible!  The daub of guacamole on top is a perfect flavor compliment to the finished plate too.

Paleo Chicken Chorizo Chili

Put some already cooked chicken pieces in a pan with some water (or broth if you prefer), and let it start simmering while you get everything else together.

Cooking Chorizo

Start your chorizo cooking in a separate skillet now and be sure to peel off the icky clear casing if you’re using sausage shaped chorizo.  I used about four ounces of Mexican chorizo that came in a square-ish container.

When the chorizo is definitely fully cooked, toss it into the pot with the chicken and water/broth.

Paleo Chicken Chorizo Chili

Next add your spices.  You’ll want a heavy dose of chili powder and about half that much of ground cumin.  Add some salt and pepper if you want to, and some red pepper flakes if you have them.

Then add your veggies and simmer for as long as you can wait!  As usual, I only waited for about ten minutes, but ideally an hour or so on a very low simmer with the lid on would be better.  Below are the vegetables I used.

  1. Mushrooms
  2. Kale
  3. Spinach
  4. Bell Peppers
  5. Tomatoes
  6. Onions
  7. Garlic

Paleo Chicken Chorizo Chili

Be careful – this dish is very red and very messy.  Aren’t all the most delicious foods messy?  Do not wear white.  You have been warned.  🙂